[ Socialist Review nr. 359 ]
socialister.dk

 

Arkivet

Forside

Simpel søgning

Udvidet søgning

Vis numre

Forsider

Indhold nr. 365
(nyeste i arkiv)

 

Temasider

Temaer

 

Hovedmenu

Internationale
Socialisters
Ungdom

Socialistisk Arbejderavis

Arkivet

Links

English
version

 

Links

Forlaget
modstand.org

Marxisme
Online

 

Arkivet – Nummervisning

Der blev fundet 36 artikler

Fra Socialist Review nr. 359

Forfatter: Titel

Nr.

Side

Udgivet

Om

Socialist Review 359: Content

359

3

jun 11

 

Noel Halifax: Women War Artists (Imperial War Museum, London)

359

2

jun 11

 

This exhbition looks at the work of women artists from the First World War to the war in Bosnia. Included are some the Imperial War Museum's most outstanding art, both commissional work such as "Ruy Loftus" by Laura Knight and women artists responding to war.

 

Mark Thomas: Editorial

359

3

jun 11

 

The global wave of revolt continues

 

Mark Thomas: Fracture lines

359

4

jun 11

 

The outcome of the elections in early May has deepened the fracture lines inside the government Coalition.

 

Iain Ferguson: Salmond smiling

359

5

jun 11

 

Anyone wanting to understand the reasons for the Scottish National Party's landslide election victory in Scotland on 5 May could do worse than read the speech delivered by Alex Salmond as he was sworn in as first minister on 20 May.

 

Sheila McGregor: However we dress, wherever we go...

359

6

jun 11

 

Women's dress keeps hitting the headlines and not because of fashion shows either.
At the beginning of April, the French government decreed that all women had to expose their bodies more as the new law against wearing the veil came into effect. Then a few weeks later, a Toronto policeman was telling students to avoid dressing like a "slut" if they wanted to avoid getting raped. In other words, they should cover up more.

 

Noel Halifax: Short reports: Cash, bigots and beagling

359

7

jun 11

 

Show me the money – Don't cut the dressage! – The mask slips – and then falls off

 

Nathan Akehurst: Our Right to Protest

359

7

jun 11

 

We are all familiar with the continuing attacks on the welfare state, public sector, and vulnerable groups in society by a raft of ideological spending cuts. In addition to that, we have seen a barrage of assaults on the basic democratic and civil right to assemble and protest, a phenomenon that has reached new heights of savagery in recent weeks.

 

Andy Durgan: Revolt reigns in Spain

359

8

jun 11

 

On Friday 20 May there were at least 160 camps in cities and towns all over Spain following demonstrations the previous Sunday "against bankers and politicians" and for "real democracy". In solidarity there have also been pickets outside Spanish embassies all over Europe.

 

James Clark: Letter from ...: Letter from Canada

359

9

jun 11

 

When Canada's federal election was called in late March, no one expected such a dramatic outcome.

 

Phil Marfleet: Act II of the Egyptian Revolution

359

10

jun 11

 

The revolutionary process in Egypt is deepening. There is now a protracted struggle going on to shape Egypt's future, as the ruling Military Council seeks to counter militancy from below.

 

Sameh Naguib: The Islamists and the Egyptian Revolution

359

14

jun 11

 

Egyptian socialist Sameh Naguib looks at the role of Islamists in the Egyptian Revolution

 

Brian Richardson: The many lives of Malcolm X

359

17

jun 11

 

Manning Marable, an academic and activist, died in April this year, just three days before the release of his biography of Malcolm X, the great icon of the Black Power Movement.Brian Richardson looks at this landmark book and the extraordinary life of Malcolm X.

 

Jack Farmer + Peyman Jafari: Making a stand with Iran's Green Movement

359

20

jun 11

 

In 2009 a mass movement was born in the streets of Iran, mobilising millions in opposition to the disputed re-election of President Ahmadinejad. Jack Farmer and Peyman Jafari spoke to author Hamid Dabashi about being an opponent of both the Iranian regime and Western imperialism.

 

Estelle Cooch: Palestine: the end of isolation?

359

23

jun 11

 

The Arab revolutions threaten to break the networks of control erected by the US and Israel. This has particular significance for Palestinians, whose oppression has been enabled by the collaboration of Arab regimes with Israel. Estelle Cooch asks whether Palestine's isolation may be coming to an end.

 

Jack Farmer: Book review: Teery Eagleton: Why Marx Was Right

359

25

jun 11

 

"This book had its origin in a single, striking thought: What if all the most familiar objections to Marx's work are mistaken? Or at least, if not totally wrongheaded, mostly so?"

 

Ken Olende: Book review: Hamid Dabashi: Brown Skin, White Masks

359

26

jun 11

 

The anti-colonialist writer Frantz Fanon's first book was a howl of outrage called Black Skin, White Masks, published in 1952. It explored the psychology of colonial subjects who came to identify with their oppressors. Hamid Dabashi has written a new howl of rage with Brown Skin, White Masks against these "native informers".

 

Marcos Schneider: Book review: Jeffrey Webber: From Rebellion to Reform in Bolivia

359

26

jun 11

 

Two terms into Bolivia's first indigenous led government, this book by Jeffrey Webber presents a sober intervention in a climate where all too often Morales and the Movimiento al Socialismo (Movement Toward Socialism, MAS) are either demonised by the right or lauded uncritically by the left.

 

Jackie Turner: Book review: Colin Leys and Stuart Player: The Plot Against the NHS

359

27

jun 11

 

This is an excellent book and a must read for health activists. Colin Leys is a professor at Goldsmiths College and Stewart Player is a public policy analyst with extensive experience in studying the NHS.
The authors have described what has been done to the NHS as a plot because it has been covert: "Neither parliament nor the public have ever been told honestly what is intended." They detail how privatisation has been introduced in bite-sized chunks to keep it below the public's radar screen.

 

Siobhan Brown: Book review: Mary Davis (ed): Class and Gender in British Labour History

359

27

jun 11

 

This is a varied collection of essays, interesting for the most part, covering women's involvement in the British labour movement. The essays cover a diverse geographical area, with the focus moving away from London to discuss women's trade unionism in areas such as Bradford, Leeds and Scotland. Its content also covers an extended time period, from Bradford weavers of the 1820s to the Leeds clothing workers of the 1970s, providing a broad assessment.

 

Beccy Reese: Book review: China Miéville: Embassytown

359

28

jun 11

 

Language surrounds us and defines who, what and where we are. Language has developed beyond a mere capacity for communication of information to serve a vast array of social and cultural functions. The idea that a certain symbol has a defined meaning enables language to be a written and not solely a verbal communication. Our language has developed so that we often don't mean exactly what we say but use similes, hyperboles and figures of speech to describe what we mean in a non-literal fashion.

 

Charlotte Bence: Book review: Sam Van Schaik: Tibet: A History

359

28

jun 11

 

Tibet is arguably most famous for its relationship with China, and for the Dalai Lama – but there is a lot more to it than that. You can only understand Tibet in the 21st century if you have an understanding of its fascinating history. Sam Van Schaik's book is a fabulous introduction to that rich history.

 

Tim Nelson: Book review: Noel Brehony: Yemen Divided

359

29

jun 11

 

This book focuses on the history of the People's Democratic Republic of Yemen (PDRY), or Southern Yemen, which was an independent state from 1967 to 1990. Noel Brehony, who was a diplomat stationed in the country, aims to provide an account of the politics of the PDRY and the events that led to its unification with the north.

 

Martin Upchurch: Book review: Michael Perelman: The Invisble Handcuffs of Capitalism

359

29

jun 11

 

Michael Perelman is a dissident among academic economists, who engages with Marxist analysis through the US based journal Monthly Review. His books aim at tempting American audiences into discovering aspects of Marxist analysis through a popular writing style.

 

New in Paperback

359

29

jun 11

 

John Le Carré – China Miévile – Alan Gibbons – Patrick Ness and Siobhan Dowd

 

Martin Smith: Pirates of the Bundesliga

359

30

jun 11

 

If you hate football with every fibre in your body, then read on. If you love football with a passion, then you need to read on too.
How can I square this circle, I hear you ask. The answer to this conundrum lies in Hamburg, Germany. There, nestling between the Reeperbahn (Hamburg's red-light district), the docks, and poor migrant and working class neighbourhoods is the Millerntor stadium, home to the football team St Pauli.

 

Magdalena Gudmundsdottir: Film review: Stake Land (Director: Jim Mickle)

359

31

jun 11

 

Stake Land tells the story of Martin, a teenager living in a post-apocalyptic world overrun by vampires.

 

Mary Brodbin: Film review: Incendies (Director: Denis Villeneuve)

359

31

jun 11

 

After the death of their mother twins Jeanne and Simon learn the surprising contents of her will. Each is handed a sealed letter. Jeanne is asked to deliver her letter to the father the twins thought was dead and Simon is to do the same with the brother they never knew they had.

 

Andrew Howard: Film review: Under the Cranes (Director: Emma-Louise Williams)

359

32

jun 11

 

Under the Cranes takes us on an odyssey through the London Borough of Hackney by foot, number 38 bus and train – from the ancient marshlands to the slums, from the theatres and market places to the private villas and squares of modern times. It urges us to consider that lively, diverse, intense cities contain the seeds of their own regeneration.

 

Adam Marks: TV review: Stewart Lee's Comedy Vehicle

359

32

jun 11

 

There are three comedians that I think embody the stand-up scene today: Frankie Boyle, talented but toxic; Michael McIntyre, pleasantly babbling like Boris Johnson's bozo blood brother; and Stewart Lee who is, apparently, the current comedian's comedian.

 

Dave Randall: Music review: OneWorld: Freedom for Palestine

359

32

jun 11

 

Activist and musician Dave Randall discusses his latest project supporting Palestine.

 

Colin Wilson: Theatre review: Chekhov: The Cherry Orchard, at the National Theatre

359

33

jun 11

 

The plot of Chekhov's classic 1903 play is uncomplicated. An indebted Russian gentry family face having to sell their estate, including a cherry orchard. In the end they sell the land where their family has lived for generations to Lopakhin, a merchant, and leave.

 

Five things to get or see this month

359

33

jun 11

 

Toulouse-Autrec and Jane Avril + Open City London Documentary Festival + Hepworth Wakefield + Countdown to Zero + Brick up the Mersey Tunnels

 

Mike Gonzalez: Exhibition Review: Joan Miro: A Blow Between the Eyes (Tate Modern)

359

34

jun 11

 

"To me rich and vigorous material seems necessary to give the spectator a blow between the eyes at first sight which must hit him before other thoughts can intervene. In this way poetry expressed visually speaks its own language" (Joan Miro)

 

Emma Davis: How can we end oppression?

359

36

jun 11

 

Emma Davis looks at how socialists understand oppression

 

Jack Farmer: Film review: Life in a Day (Director: Kevin Macdonald)

359

 

jun 11

 

Life in a Day starts with a simple premise, which results in a simple film. The producers put out a call for people across the world to film themselves for one day, 24 July 2010. Many responded, documenting their lives and uploading the resulting video to YouTube. This provided the filmmakers with some 1,500 hours of footage, from which they have made a feature length film.

 

Der blev fundet 36 artikler

< Nr. 358 –– Nr. 360 >

Vis uden kommentarer

 

 

www.socialister.dk – 20. august 2018 kl. 07:02